slide 1
Image Slide 2
Image Slide 1
Image Slide 3
PeyotPhoto (6)
previous arrowprevious arrow
next arrownext arrow

Mexican Native Art

Mexico has a great variety of culture, much of which may still be undiscovered. Artists from indigenous communities show much of their culture through art, representing stories of their ancestors, deities, but more importantly, to preserve the culture of their community.


Chaquira

This art is characterized by colorful beads to decorate their offerings, which initially were made of seeds, then plastic beads and finally glass beads. These offerings are given to their deities to petition for a need, usually water for their crops, health for their population, in gratitude, among other things, depending on the time of the year. Their deities are found in their different ceremonial centers which are located in the five cardinal points.

Wixarika

From the word “Nierika” in the Wixarika dialect. These are representations of ceremonial rituals, sacred places, illustrations of their deities, calendars, or even a mixture of all of these. The Wixarika use a wooden frame, wax and yarn of different colors. Depending on the artist, the detail given to the paintings with the pressed yarn varies.

Alebrijes

Wooden figures, carved in wood and decorated by hand. They represent the spiritual and protective animal which shares with a human being, within the Zapotec culture these are known as Tonas and Nahuales. Carved in Copal wood and painted in their beginnings with natural dyes, nowadays new techniques have been implemented to make more colorful designs and to continue preserving their Zapotec ornaments captured in these pieces.

Clay and Ceramics

In many states of Mexico, pottery has predominated as part of their culture, each one of them has adopted different styles and techniques that show their place of origin, some in the decoration, others in the materials used and even in the firing phase. However, all of them have a similar origin, from being tools or utensils for the basic needs of their community to becoming marvelous works of Mexican art.