Arte

slide 1
Image Slide 2
Image Slide 1
Image Slide 3
PeyotPhoto (6)
previous arrowprevious arrow
next arrownext arrow

Mexican Native Art

Mexico has a great variety of culture, much of which may still be undiscovered. Artists from indigenous communities show much of their culture through art, representing stories of their ancestors, deities, but more importantly, to preserve the culture of their community.


slide 1
Image Slide 2
Image Slide 1
Image Slide 3
previous arrowprevious arrow
next arrownext arrow

Beaded Art

The beaded art by the Wixarika (Huichol) originally started as a form of offerings that would be left at a ceremonial site. They are often characterized by a large array of colors and have several symbols, each representing a different icon of their mythology. The beads come in two sizes, the regular and a smaller version called micro beads, which can be used to create a higher level of detail to the pieces.

Wixarika Yarn Paintings

From the word “Nierika” in the Wixarika dialect. These are representations of ceremonial rituals, sacred places, illustrations of their deities, calendars, or even a mixture of all of these. The Wixarika use a wooden frame, wax and yarn of different colors. Depending on the artist, the detail given to the paintings with the pressed yarn varies.

slide 1
Image Slide 2
Image Slide 1
Image Slide 3
previous arrowprevious arrow
next arrownext arrow
slide 1
Image Slide 2
Image Slide 1
Image Slide 3
previous arrowprevious arrow
next arrownext arrow

Oaxacan Wood Carvings

Wooden figures, carved out of wood and painted by hand. They represent the spiritual and protective animal embodied by each human being as depicted within the Zapotec mythos. These are also known as Tonas and Nahuales. They are carved out of Copal wood and painted are all painted in unique ways. The paintings vary from floral patterns to Zapotec geometric designs that can be found in the archeological sites.

Ceramics

In many states of Mexico, pottery has been an integral part of their culture. Each region has adopted its own style that show their place of origin. Some of the techniques used in their creation can be dated back to prehispanic times. The designs are a blend of traditional Mexican pottery with a more contemporary palette touch to them.

slide 1
Image Slide 2
Image Slide 1
Image Slide 3
previous arrowprevious arrow
next arrownext arrow